Teaching Corequisite WRIT 100

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Corequisite Writing 100 combines the DWR’s introductory course to academic writing, Writing 100, with a corequisite course, designed to support students’ work in Writing 100 while simultaneously fulfilling the DS 98 requirement.  Corequisite Writing 100 meets five days per week, with Writing 100 scheduled on M/W/F and the corequisite course scheduled on T/Th. Upon successful completion of the course, students move into Writing 102 or Liberal Arts 102.



About the Corequisite Courses

The corequisite course mirrors the sequence of Writing 100 with a focus on drafting and revising the major projects as well as journaling, discussing readings, working in small groups, and examining ways to improve writing.

The grade for the corequisite course is comprised equally of attendance, preparation, participation, and the journal.


Corequisite Teaching Resources

Sofa to 5k: Active Reading (from Florida State; suggested time is 40 minutes): This exercise demonstrates the relationship between active-reading and efficient-reading.
Active Reading Before and After (from Texas State; suggested time is 30 minutes): This exercise asks students to consider and improve reading techniques, as well as demonstrating the benefits of active reading to retention and comprehension capability.
Reading Retention (from John Gardner and Betsy Barefoot; suggested time is 30 minutes): This exercise highlights a retention strategy in relation to the transition to college and helping students persist in the first year.
Active Reading Practice: Speed Dating Style (from Texas State; suggested time is 25 minutes): This exercise allows students to gain an appreciation for the variety of opportunities to engage with a common text, as well as to gain comfort in sharing with one another, especially early in the semester.
Double Entry Notebook (adapted from the Hacker Handbook; suggested time is 45 minutes): This exercise helps students identify, analyze, and respond to key passages and/or ideas within a text.
Making Active Reading Work for You: Designing a Textual Interrogation (from Texas State; suggested time is 25 minutes): This exercise helps students gain insight into personalized learning methods and meta-awareness of one’s relationship to a text.
A Helpful Breakdown of an Analysis Paragraph (suggested time is 10-20 minutes): This exercise helps students recognize the elements of an analysis paragraph.
Ad Analysis (from Writing Commons, time varies according to reading): These readings include some exercises and questions pertaining to ad analysis.
“Analyzing Advertisements” (from The University of Southern Florida; time is 3 minutes and 32 seconds): This YouTube video gives a summary of rhetorical appeals and the rhetorical triangle.
Analyzing Artifacts (from learner.org, suggested time is 10-15 minutes): This exercise gives practice in close examination of a physical object.
Artifact and Analysis (from Smithsonian, time varies according to exercise): These exercises relate to analyzing a physical object.
Audience Analysis (from Writing Commons, time varies according to reading): These readings include some exercises and questions pertaining to audience analysis.
Conducting a Spatial Analysis through the Lens of Universal Design (from Writing Commons, suggested time is 30+ minutes): This reading and exercise gives students information about and practice in conducting a spatial analysis.
Instructions for Newspaper Analysis (from Bears Den English, suggested time is 30-45 minutes): This exercise gives students practice in analyzing a news article.
Persuading an Audience Using Ethos, Pathos, and Logos (from The New York Times Learning Network, suggested time is 30-45 minutes): In this activity, students explore how writers use ethos, logos, and pathos to persuade an audience.
Rhetoric (from Writing Commons, time varies according to reading): These readings include some exercises and questions pertaining to rhetorical appeals, logical fallacies, and rhetoric in general.
“Rhetorical Analysis of Taylor Swift’s Blank Space” (from www.teachargument.com; time is 15 minutes and 53 seconds): This YouTube video models the close reading and critical thinking required in analysis.
Rhetorical Mad Libs (from Stanford; suggested time is 50 minutes): This activity encourages students to think about audience when writing a rhetorical analysis.
“What is Analysis” (from The Seahorse Project; time is 2 minutes and 25 seconds): This YouTube video defines analysis and gives some concrete strategies.
Problem/Solution Process Guide (adapted from The Writer’s Practice by John Warner, suggested time is several class periods): These guided questions help students reflect on their choices as they compose the argument project.
Invention/Brainstorming:  Writing can Lead to Change (suggested time is 30-45 minutes): These articles showcase how one researcher, a 12-year-old girl, asked an interesting question and changed the video game industry.
Brainstorming:  Head, Heart, Hand (suggested time is 20 minutes): These questions help students brainstorm potential research interests.
Information Literacy and Research: Authorial Biases (suggested time is 50-60 minutes): This short reading and handout helps students who are evaluating sources consider the question of authorial biases.
Counter-argument Exercise: Modeling “Letter from Birmingham Jail” (suggested time is 50-75 minutes): This reading/writing assignment gives students practice in crafting counterarguments.
Bellringers (suggested time is 3-5 minutes at the beginning of class): This exercise reinforces the importance of attendance and getting to class on time.
Modeled Grading (suggested time is 20-30 minutes): Through this exercise, students become aware of how writing is perceived by an evaluator, as well as common grammatical pitfalls
Incorporating Textual Evidence (from teacheroffduty.com/your-secret-weapon-to-teaching-textual-evidence/; suggested time is 30-45 minutes): This exercise provides practice in the conventions of source integration.
Integrating Evidence Modeling Activity (suggested time is 30-45 minutes): This exercise provides practice in integrating through quotation, summary, and paraphrase.
Brainstorming and Thesis Development Exercise (from Texas State; suggested time is 60 minutes): This activity uses brainstorming to help students move toward developing a thesis.
Putting Theses to the Test (from Texas State; suggested time is 60 minutes): This activity allows students to practice identifying what makes a thesis statement strong versus weak and why.
Thesis Speed Dating (from Texas State; suggested time is 45-60 minutes): This exercise provides practice for students in evaluating thesis statements and talking with other writers about their work.
Thesis Statement Activity (from Excelsior OWL; suggested time is 5-10 minutes): Use this activity to check general knowledge of thesis statements.
Possible Sentences (from Moore and Moore, Reading in the Content Areas; suggested time is 30-45 minutes): This simple strategy improves recall of vocabulary and comprehension of the text containing that vocabulary.